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Endocrinol Nutr. 2009 Apr;56(4):164-9. doi: 10.1016/S1575-0922(09)70980-5. Epub 2009 Jun 11.

[Prevalence of deficient and insufficient vitamin D levels in a young healthy population].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición. Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre. Madrid. España. mariacalataguti@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Recent studies have shown a high frequency of insufficient serum vitamin D levels in the general population, especially in the elderly and in individuals with osteoporosis. Data from the young adult population are scarce, but also reveal a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in this age group. The main reasons for this high prevalence seem to be poor dietary vitamin D intake and low sun exposure. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in a young healthy population and its association with concentrations of calcium and parathyroid hormone and sun exposure.

METHODS:

We performed an observational, descriptive study in 116 subjects (38 men and 78 women aged 26.56 +/- 3.32 years), during the late spring and early summer of 2007. Fasting blood samples were obtained and levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D, intact parathyroid hormone, calcium, albumin and creatinine were measured. A questionnaire designed to assess sun exposure and sunshine protection during the previous 12 months was administered.

RESULTS:

The mean value of 25-hydroxivitamin D obtained was 24.58 +/- 6.98 ng/ml. The subjects were divided into three groups according to 25-hydroxivitamin D levels: deficient: < 20 ng/ml (27.58%); insufficient: 20-30 ng/ml (56.03%); and sufficient: > or = 30 ng/ml (16.37%). No statistically significant differences were found between the groups or the studied variables except for age in relation to vitamin D levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study shows a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in a young healthy population with no clear relationship with sun exposure or sunscreen protection. The low intake of food rich in vitamin D and the lack of food fortification combined with scarce effective sun exposure could account for the low serum levels of vitamin D in this population.

PMID:
19627732
DOI:
10.1016/S1575-0922(09)70980-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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