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J Occup Environ Med. 2009 Aug;51(8):870-8. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181a9086c.

Distribution of effort-reward imbalance in Denmark and its prospective association with a decline in self-rated health.

Author information

1
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rer@nrcwe.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the distribution of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and to investigate its impact on self-rated health in a representative sample of the Danish workforce.

METHODS:

We studied 4977 employees who responded to a questionnaire in 2000, of which 3470 responded to a follow-up survey in 2005.

RESULTS:

The highest (ie, most unfavorable) ERI ratio was found in executives in the public sector, social workers, managing clerks in the public sector, and medical secretaries. A one standard deviation increase of the ERI ratio predicted a 12% (95% confidence intervals = 1.01 to 1.24) decline in self-rated health after adjustment for all covariates.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study that identified job groups with a high exposure to ERI in a representative sample of a national workforce. ERI was a risk factor for a decline in self-rated health.

PMID:
19620893
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181a9086c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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