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Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009 Jul;135(7):642-6. doi: 10.1001/archoto.2009.74.

Improved behavior and sleep after adenotonsillectomy in children with sleep-disordered breathing: long-term follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Mail Stop 3010, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA. jwei@kumc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether previously published changes are maintained over time in children after adenotonsillectomy for sleep-disordered breathing using the validated Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Conners Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form (CPRS-R:S).

DESIGN:

Prospective, nonrandomized interventional study.

SETTING:

Ambulatory surgery center affiliated with an academic medical center.

PATIENTS:

Long-term follow-up data were available (ranging from 2.4 to 3.6 years after adenotonsillectomy) for 44 of the 71 patients who completed our initial study comparing PSQ and CPRS-R:S data before and 6 months after surgery.

INTERVENTIONS:

Parents completed the PSQ and CPRS-R:S at least 2 years after surgery.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Follow-up PSQ data and long-term changes in age- and sex-adjusted T scores for all 4 CPRS-R:S behavior categories (oppositional behavior, cognitive problems or inattention, hyperactivity, and the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] index) were determined for each patient. Linear mixed models were used to analyze the data.

RESULTS:

Globally, across time, most variables remained below baseline levels (P < .05). There was a significant increase in PSQ scores during follow-up, but over this period they did not reach baseline levels. Comparing short-term with long-term follow-up, the Conners scores in all behavioral categories did not increase significantly (ADHD index, P = .61; cognitive problems or inattention, P = .02; hyperactivity, P < .001; and oppositional behavior, P < .001). The ADHD index at long-term follow-up was not different from that at baseline, a finding that might be attributable to the high degree of variability in this measure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Improvements in sleep experienced by children after adenotonsillectomy for sleep-disordered breathing were not as great 2.5 years after surgery as they were 6 months after surgery but were still significant compared with baseline levels. Improvements in behavior were maintained in all categories of the Conners scores except for the ADHD index.

PMID:
19620583
DOI:
10.1001/archoto.2009.74
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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