Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatrics. 2009 Aug;124(2):e195-202. doi: 10.1542/peds.2008-3506. Epub 2009 Jul 20.

Prenatal airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and child IQ at age 5 years.

Author information

  • 1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Healt, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. fpp1@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study evaluated the relationship between prenatal exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and child intelligence.

METHODS:

Children of nonsmoking black or Dominican-American women residing in New York City were monitored from in utero to 5 years of age, with determination of prenatal PAH exposure through personal air monitoring for the mothers during pregnancy. At 5 years of age, intelligence was assessed for 249 children by using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised. Multivariate linear regression models were used to estimate and to test the associations between prenatal PAH exposure and IQ.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for maternal intelligence, quality of the home caretaking environment, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and other potentially confounding factors, high PAH levels (above the median of 2.26 ng/m(3)) were inversely associated with full-scale IQ (P = .007) and verbal IQ (P = .003) scores. Children in the high-exposure group had full-scale and verbal IQ scores that were 4.31 and 4.67 points lower, respectively, than those of less-exposed children (<or=2.26 ng/m(3)). The associations between logarithmically transformed, continuous, PAH levels and these IQ measures also were significant (full-scale IQ: beta = -3.00; P = .009; verbal IQ: beta = -3.53; P = .002).

CONCLUSION:

These results provide evidence that environmental PAHs at levels encountered in New York City air can affect children's IQ adversely.

PMID:
19620194
PMCID:
PMC2864932
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2008-3506
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center