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Am Heart J. 2009 Aug;158(2):209-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2009.05.020.

Distribution and determinants of Doppler-derived diastolic flow indices in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study (JHS).

Author information

1
The University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, MS 39216, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this study is to investigate the distribution and determinants of diastolic function in a middle-aged cohort of African Americans (AA).

BACKGROUND:

The distribution and determinants of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in AA are not well-described despite high rates of AA with diastolic heart failure and a five-fold higher risk of death in those with diastolic dysfunction (DD) compared to normal diastolic function.

METHODS:

Four categories of diastolic function were defined in JHS participants undergoing echocardiograms at the first examination (2001-2004) using mitral and pulmonary vein velocities. Investigators used logistic regression to assess the independent relation of DD to traditional risk factors and LV systolic dysfunction.

RESULTS:

Of the 3,571 study participants (mean age, 56 +/- 12 years; 63.9% female), 70.4% had normal diastolic function, and 18.0%, 10.6%, and 0.9% had mild, moderate, and severe DD, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, DD was significantly related to age (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.4), male sex (OR 1.3 CI 1.0-1.5), LV systolic dysfunction (OR 1.5, CI 1.2-2.0), body mass index (OR 0.8, CI 0.8-0.9), and heart rate (OR 1.2; CI 1.1-1.2). The severity of DD was significantly related with age (OR 0.3; CI 0.3, 0.4), male sex (OR 1.6; CI 1.2-2.2), hypertension (OR 0.6, CI 0.4-0.8), and heart rate (OR 0.7; CI 0.6-0.8).

CONCLUSION:

This is the largest community-based analysis of LV diastolic function in middle-aged AA. DD was present in 29.5% and independently related to several traditional risk factors and LV systolic dysfunction.

PMID:
19619696
PMCID:
PMC3293244
DOI:
10.1016/j.ahj.2009.05.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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