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J Pediatr. 2009 Nov;155(5):646-50. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.05.003. Epub 2009 Jul 19.

Evaluation of hearing loss after failed neonatal hearing screening.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. lisanneholster@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated the causes of hearing loss found after failed universal newborn hearing screening and compared the results with the previously used behavioral observation test (Ewing/CAPAS).

STUDY DESIGN:

Hearing loss in neonates, born between September 1999 and October 2007 and referred to our center after failed screening, was determined by audiologic testing and physical examination.

RESULTS:

In 340 included neonates the results of hearing tests were as follows: normal hearing 21.2%, conductive hearing loss 20.3%, and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) 57.9%. Children referred from the neonatal intensive care unit were more at risk of SNHL (71%) than those from the well-baby clinics (54%). Hearing aids were provided at a median age of 8 months. The positive predictive value of SNHL screening was 54% for a child from a well-baby clinic and 71% for a child from the neonatal intensive care unit.

CONCLUSION:

The use of universal newborn hearing screening results in a lower proportion of infants positive because of otitis media with effusion than the previously used Ewing/CAPAS test (20% vs 59-81%). Second, screening leads to identification of hearing loss and intervention at a younger age (8 months vs 15-18 months). Third, the positive predictive value for SNHL has improved (54% vs 2%).

PMID:
19616786
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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