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Nanomedicine. 2010 Feb;6(1):127-36. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2009.06.004. Epub 2009 Jul 16.

Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres as novel potential nanocarriers for biomedical applications.

Author information

1
Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912, USA. sli@mcg.edu

Abstract

Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres (PW-HGMs) are a novel form of glass material consisting of a 10- to 100-microm-diameter hollow central cavity surrounded by a 1-microm-thick silica shell. A tortuous network of nanometer-scale channels completely penetrates the shell. We show here that these channels promote size-dependent uptake and controlled release of biological molecules in the 3- to 8-nm range, including antibodies and a modified single-chain antibody variable fragment. In addition, a 6-nm (70-kDa) dextran can be used to gate the porous walls, facilitating controlled release of an internalized short interfering RNA. PW-HGMs remained in place after mouse intratumoral injection, suggesting a possible application for the delivery of anticancer drugs. The combination of a hollow central cavity that can carry soluble therapeutic agents with mesoporous walls for controlled release is a unique characteristic that distinguishes PW-HGMs from other glass materials for biomedical applications.

FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR:

Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres (PW-HGMs) are a novel form of glass microparticles with a tortuous network of nanometer-scale channels. These channels allow size-dependent uptake and controlled release of biological molecules including antibodies and single-chain antibody fragments. PW-HGMs remained in place after mouse intratumoral injection, suggesting a possible application for the delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

PMID:
19616128
PMCID:
PMC3148814
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2009.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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