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Kidney Int. 2009 Oct;76(8):818-24. doi: 10.1038/ki.2009.247. Epub 2009 Jul 15.

Hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia.

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1
Center for the Study of Hepatitis C, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA. charlee@rockefeller.edu

Abstract

In this review we discuss the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cryoglobulinemia. HCV is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and is increasingly recognized as an instigator of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Cryoglobulinemia is characterized by the clonal expansion of rheumatoid factor-expressing B cells in the liver, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood, resulting in the presence of cryoglobulins in the circulation. Cryoglobulins are cold-insoluble immune complexes containing rheumatoid factor, polyclonal IgG, and HCV RNA that precipitate and deposit on vascular endothelium, causing vasculitis in organs such as the skin, kidneys, and peripheral nerves. A subset of patients develops a low-grade lymphoma composed of B cells that are immunophenotypically similar to the expanded B cells seen in cryoglobulinemia. HCV-related B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders likely comprise a spectrum of disease, ranging from asymptomatic clonal B-cell expansions to pathogenic cryoglobulinemia and lymphoma. It is unclear how B cells become dysregulated during the course of chronic HCV infection, and continued patient-centered research is necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of HCV-related B-cell dysregulation.

PMID:
19606079
PMCID:
PMC2755598
DOI:
10.1038/ki.2009.247
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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