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Indian J Med Sci. 2009 Jun;63(6):235-43. doi: 10.4103/0019-5359.53391.

Objective standardized clinical assessment with feedback: Adapting the objective structured clinical examination for postgraduate psychiatry training in India.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India. prabhasch@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is used commonly for assessment of psychiatry trainees but has been used less for teaching. AIM AND SETTING: This study describes the adaptation of the OSCE method for training purposes in a postgraduate psychiatry training center in India and the initial findings with regard to trainee performance.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The adapted method was called the objective structured clinical assessment with feedback (OSCAF). The adaptation included several steps--modifying existing OSCE patterns for language and cultural appropriateness, using supervised roleplaying instead of standardized or simulated patients and evolving an assessment method (14-item checklist) that would generate feedback. This exercise was conducted in front of a group of multidisciplinary peers and supervisors.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

Descriptive statistics and ANOVA were used.

RESULTS:

Analysis of the performance based on the 14-item checklist assessing common elements of any patient-related interaction in 34 different OSCAF tasks indicated the following: less-than-satisfactory (<75%) performances in the following areas--assuring confidentiality (73.5%), assessing comfort (62%), summarizing (60%), closure (62%) and checking whether the 'patient' had understood what was being communicated (42%). Based on the nature of clinical situations, performances on some specific and difficult OSCAF situations were found to be inadequate and indicated need for further training.

CONCLUSIONS:

We have been able to demonstrate OSCAF to be a convenient, cost-effective training method in psychiatry, with limited demands on resources; however, further refinements in ratings and feedback methods and studies on effectiveness may enhance its utility.

PMID:
19602757
DOI:
10.4103/0019-5359.53391
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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