Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Health Promot. 2009 Jul-Aug;23(6):423-30. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.081010-QUAN-227.

Predicted national productivity implications of calorie and sodium reductions in the American diet.

Author information

1
The Lewin Group, 3130 Fairview Park Dr, Suite 800, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA. Tim.dall@lewin.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To model the potential long-term national productivity benefits from reduced daily intake of calories and sodium.

DESIGN:

Simulation based on secondary data analysis; quantitative research. Measures include absenteeism, presenteeism, disability, and premature mortality under various hypothetical dietary changes.

SETTING:

United States.

SUBJECTS:

Two hundred twenty-five million adults.

MEASURES:

Findings come from a Nutrition Impact Model that combines information from national surveys, peer-reviewed studies, and government reports.

ANALYSIS:

We compare current estimates of national productivity loss associated with overweight, obesity, and hypertension to estimates for hypothetical scenarios in which national prevalence of these risk factors is lower. Using the simulation model, we illustrate how modest dietary change can achieve lower national prevalence of excess weight and hypertension.

RESULTS:

We estimate that permanent 100-kcal reductions in daily intake among the overweight/obese would eliminate approximately 71.2 million cases of overweight/obesity. In the long term, this could increase national productivity by $45.7 billion annually. Long-term sodium reductions of 400 mg in those with uncontrolled hypertension would eliminate about 1.5 million cases, potentially increasing productivity by $2.5 billion annually. More aggressive diet changes of 500 kcal and 1100 mg of sodium reductions yield potential productivity benefits of $133.3 and $5.8 billion, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The potential long-term benefit of reduced calories and sodium, combining medical cost savings with productivity increases, ranges from $108.5 billion for moderate reductions to $255.6 billion for aggressive reductions. These findings help inform public health policy and the business case for improving diet. (AmJ Health Promot 2009;23[6]:423-430.)

PMID:
19601482
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.081010-QUAN-227
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center