Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatrics. 2009 Aug;124(2):541-7. doi: 10.1542/peds.2008-2489. Epub 2009 Jul 13.

Injuries associated with bathtubs and showers among children in the United States.

Author information

1
The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goal was to describe the epidemiological features of injuries associated with bathtubs and showers, especially those related to slips, trips, and falls, among US children.

METHODS:

A retrospective study was performed by using nationally representative data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission National Electronic Injury Surveillance System from 1990 through 2007 for children <or=18 years of age.

RESULTS:

There were an estimated 791 200 bathtub- and shower-related injuries among children <or=18 years of age who were treated in US emergency departments in 1990-2007, with an average of 43 600 cases per year or approximately 5.9 injuries per 10 000 US children per year. The largest number of injuries involved children 2 years of age; children <or=4 years accounted for 54.3% of injuries. The most common diagnosis was laceration (59.5%). The most common mechanism of injury was a slip, trip, or fall, accounting for 81.0% of cases or 4.6 injuries per 10 000 US children per year. The most frequently injured body part was the face (48.0%), followed by the head/neck (15.0%). The majority (71.3%) of injuries occurred in a bathtub. Of the cases with a known place of injury, 97.1% occurred at home. An estimated 2.8% of patients were admitted, transferred to another hospital, or held for observation.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study on bathtub- and shower-related injuries using nationally representative data. Slips, trips, and falls in bathtubs and showers are a common cause of injury among children, especially children <or=4 years of age. The incidence of these injuries may be decreased by increasing the coefficient of friction of bathtub and shower surfaces.

PMID:
19596735
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2008-2489
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center