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Bone. 2010 Jan;46(1):4-12. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2009.06.029. Epub 2009 Jul 8.

The emerging role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the skeleton and its mediation of the skeletal effects of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5).

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. stwarden@iupui.edu

Abstract

Novel molecular pathways obligatory for bone health are being rapidly identified. One pathway recently revealed involves gut-derived 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) mediation of the complete skeletal effects of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5). Mounting evidence supports 5-HT as an important regulatory compound in bone with previous evidence demonstrating that bone cells possess functional pathways for responding to 5-HT. In addition, there is growing evidence that potentiation of 5-HT signaling via inhibition of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) has significant skeletal effects. The later is clinically significant as the 5-HTT is a popular target of pharmaceutical agents, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), used for the management of major depressive disorder and other affective conditions. The observation that 5-HT mediates the complete skeletal effects of LRP5 represents a significant paradigm shift from the traditional view that LRP5 located on the cell surface membrane of osteoblasts exerts direct skeletal effects via Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. This paper discusses the mounting evidence for skeletal effects of 5-HT and the ability of gut-derived 5-HT to satisfactorily explain the skeletal effects of LRP5.

PMID:
19591966
PMCID:
PMC2818040
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2009.06.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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