Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2009 Dec;24(12):3805-11. doi: 10.1093/ndt/gfp332. Epub 2009 Jul 8.

Home blood pressure monitoring in blood pressure control among haemodialysis patients: an open randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Nephrology Division, Hypertension Unit, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil. giovanio@usp.br

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is not known if the adjustment of antihypertensive therapy based on home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) can improve blood pressure (BP) control among haemodialysis patients.

METHODS:

This is an open randomized clinical trial. Hypertensive patients on haemodialysis were randomized to have the antihypertensive therapy adjusted based on predialysis BP measurements or HBPM. Before and after 6 months of follow-up, patients were submitted to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for 24 h, HBPM during 1 week and echocardiogram.

RESULTS:

A total of 34 and 31 patients completed the study in the HBPM and predialysis BP groups, respectively. At the end of study, the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure during the interdialytic period measured by ABPM were significantly lower in the HBPM group in relation to the predialysis BP group (mean 24-h BP: 135 +/- 12 mmHg/76 +/- 7 mmHg versus 147 +/- 15 mmHg/79 +/- 8 mmHg; P < 0.05). In the HBPM analysis, the HBPM group showed a significant reduction only in SBP compared to the predialysis BP group (weekly mean: 144 +/- 21 mmHg versus 154 +/- 22 mmHg; P < 0.05). There were no differences between the HBPM and predialysis BP groups in relation to the left ventricular mass index at the end of the study (108 +/- 35 g/m(2) versus 110 +/- 33 g/m(2); P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Decision making based on HBPM among haemodialysis patients has led to a better BP control during the interdialytic period in comparison with predialysis BP measurements. HBPM may be a useful adjuvant instrument for blood pressure control among haemodialysis patients.

PMID:
19586971
DOI:
10.1093/ndt/gfp332
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center