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Dev Psychol. 2009 Jul;45(4):942-57. doi: 10.1037/a0016162.

The protective effects of neighborhood collective efficacy on British children growing up in deprivation: a developmental analysis.

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  • 1Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA, 92697-7085, USA. codgers@uci.edu

Abstract

This article reports on the influence of neighborhood-level deprivation and collective efficacy on children's antisocial behavior between the ages of 5 and 10 years. Latent growth curve modeling was applied to characterize the developmental course of antisocial behavior among children in the E-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, an epidemiological cohort of 2,232 children. Children in deprived versus affluent neighborhoods had higher levels of antisocial behavior at school entry (24.1 vs. 20.5, p < .001) and a slower rate of decline from involvement in antisocial behavior between the ages of 5 and 10 (-0.54 vs. -0.78, p < .01). Neighborhood collective efficacy was negatively associated with levels of antisocial behavior at school entry (r = -.10, p < .01) but only in deprived neighborhoods; this relationship held after controlling for neighborhood problems and family-level factors. Collective efficacy did not predict the rate of change in antisocial behavior between the ages of 5 and 10. Findings suggest that neighborhood collective efficacy may have a protective effect on children living in deprived contexts.

PMID:
19586172
PMCID:
PMC4212822
DOI:
10.1037/a0016162
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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