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J Ren Nutr. 2009 Sep;19(5):389-95. doi: 10.1053/j.jrn.2009.01.020. Epub 2009 Jul 3.

Effects of soy consumption on oxidative stress, blood homocysteine, coagulation factors, and phosphorus in peritoneal dialysis patients.

Author information

1
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We studied the effects of soy consumption on oxidative stress, blood homocysteine, coagulation factors, and phosphorus in peritoneal dialysis patients.

DESIGN:

This was an unblinded, randomized clinical trial.

SETTING:

This study involved peritoneal dialysis centers in Tehran, Iran.

PATIENTS:

We included 40 peritoneal dialysis patients (20 males and 20 females).

INTERVENTION:

Peritoneal dialysis patients were randomly assigned to either a soy or control group. Patients in the soy group received 28 g/day textured soy flour (containing 14 g of soy protein) for 8 weeks, whereas patients in the control group received their usual diet, without any soy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Blood oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), homocysteine, phosphorus, fibrinogen concentrations, and the activities of coagulation factors VII, IX, and X were measured at baseline and at the end of week 8 of the study.

RESULTS:

The percentage of plasma coagulation factor IX activity decreased significantly by 17% in the soy group at the end of week 8 compared with baseline (P < .01), and the reduction was significant compared with the control group (P < .05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean changes of blood ox-LDL, homocysteine, phosphorus, fibrinogen concentrations, and the activities of coagulation factors VII and X.

CONCLUSION:

Soy consumption reduces plasma coagulation factor IX activity, which is a risk factor for thrombosis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

PMID:
19577483
DOI:
10.1053/j.jrn.2009.01.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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