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J Spinal Cord Med. 2009;32(2):162-74.

A latent variable structural path model of health behaviors after spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA. Krause@musc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE:

To develop a latent behavioral model by identifying and confirming the factor structure of health behaviors of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and their relationships with biographic, injury, and educational characteristics.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

Survey data were collected from 1388 adults with traumatic SCI of at least 1 year duration.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Selection of health behaviors was based on a bidimensional behavioral risk model. Behaviors were measured by core item sets from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and supplemented by an alcohol screening measure, select fitness proxies, and the SCI Health Survey.

RESULTS:

Latent variable structural equation modeling was used to identify underlying factors and their relationship with participant characteristics. Seven specific factors were identified by exploratory factor analysis and were cross-validated using confirmatory factor analysis. They included: (a) healthy nutrition, (b) unhealthy nutrition, (c) fitness, (d) smoking, (e) alcohol use, (f) psychotropic prescription medications, and (g) SCI healthy activities. Two higher-order dimensions were also identified, including a risk dimension (b, d, e) and a protective dimension (a, c, g). Participant characteristics were associated with the domains. For instance, participants with the most severe injuries scored lower on smoking and alcohol but higher on psychotropic medications; age was positively correlated with healthy nutrition and negatively correlated with alcohol and tobacco use but also negatively correlated with fitness.

CONCLUSION:

Behaviors can be meaningfully combined into underlying dimensions to more efficiently use them as predictors of secondary conditions.

PMID:
19569464
PMCID:
PMC2678288
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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