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Psychosomatics. 2009 May-Jun;50(3):206-17. doi: 10.1176/appi.psy.50.3.206.

Dexmedetomidine and the reduction of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery.

Author information

1
Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd., Suite 2317, Stanford, CA 94305-5546, USA. jrm@stanford.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Delirium is a neurobehavioral syndrome caused by the transient disruption of normal neuronal activity secondary to systemic disturbances.

OBJECTIVE:

The authors investigated the effects of postoperative sedation on the development of delirium in patients undergoing cardiac-valve procedures.

METHODS:

Patients underwent elective cardiac surgery with a standardized intraoperative anesthesia protocol, followed by random assignment to one of three postoperative sedation protocols: dexmedetomidine, propofol, or midazolam.

RESULTS:

The incidence of delirium for patients receiving dexmedetomidine was 3%, for those receiving propofol was 50%, and for patients receiving midazolam, 50%. Patients who developed postoperative delirium experienced significantly longer intensive-care stays and longer total hospitalization.

CONCLUSION:

The findings of this open-label, randomized clinical investigation suggest that postoperative sedation with dexmedetomidine was associated with significantly lower rates of postoperative delirium and lower care costs.

PMID:
19567759
DOI:
10.1176/appi.psy.50.3.206
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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