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West Indian Med J. 2008 Mar;57(2):141-6.

The impact of gender, family and type of school on smoking in adolescents in Eyup, Istanbul, Turkey.

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  • 1Abant Izzet Baysal University, Izzet Baysal Faculty of Medicine, Department of Chest Diseases, Bolu, Turkey. ftalay2000@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to determine the influence of smoking habits and education of family, parents, the type of school and gender on smoking in adolescents.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study was performed on 1062 students from eight high schools in Eyup, Istanbul.

RESULTS:

Twenty-five per cent of students were current smokers (30.1% of boys [n = 551], 20.9% girls [n= 511] 95% CI [26%, 34%] and [17%, 24%] respectively, (p < 0.05). Smoking rate was highest in vocational high schools and lowest in super high schools (33% [n = 406, 95% CI (29%, 38%)] and 11% [n = 127, 95% CI (6%, 17%)] respectively, p < 0.05). Smoking rate was higher in mothers (31.6% [n = 174, 95% CI (25%, 39%)] vs 15.5% [n = 336, 95% CI(12%, 19%)] and siblings (27.7% [n = 141, 95% CI (20%, 35%)] vs 18% [n = 350, 95% CI (14%, 22%)] of the female students who smoke than of those who did not smoke (p < 0.05). The rate of smoking in the siblings of 'smoker' boys was higher than that of 'non-smoker' boys (44.6% [n = 130, 95% CI (36%, 53%)] and 26.1% [n = 402, 95% CI (22%, 30%)] respectively; p < 0.05). The education level of 28%, [n = 82, 95% CI (19%, 39%)] of the mothers of 'smoker' girls, and of 19.6% [n = 429, 95% CI (16%, 23%)] of 'non-smoker' girls was high school and above (p < 0.05). The rate of high school and above education was higher in parents of male students who smoke than that in nonsmokers [45.1% and 27.9%, 95% CI (33%, 55%)] and (24%, 32%), respectively, p < 0.05. Number of smokers saying "Yes" in support of controlling smoking was less than non-smokers (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Smoking rate was higher in boys, in vocational high schools and seems to be influenced by smoking habits and higher educational levels of their family members. This influence differs according to gender. Anti-tobacco messages should target family, friends and schools of adolescents.

PMID:
19565957
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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