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Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Jul;34(1):85-9. doi: 10.1002/uog.6405.

Cesarean scar defect: correlation between Cesarean section number, defect size, clinical symptoms and uterine position.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chia Yi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Pu Tz City, Taiwan. brien@ms23.hinet.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of clinical symptoms associated with Cesarean scar defects, and to determine the association between the size of these defects, clinical complaints, uterine position, and a history of multiple Cesarean sections.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional study, Cesarean scar defects in women with a history of transverse lower-segment Cesarean section were measured by transvaginal ultrasound while being assessed for other gynecological conditions. The relationships between the size of the Cesarean scar defect and the clinical symptoms, uterine position and number of previous Cesarean sections were evaluated. Patients with other uterine pathologies, including endometrial hyperplasia, polyps, malignancy and submucosal myomas, were excluded from the study.

RESULTS:

During a 3-year period, 4250 women were assessed by transvaginal sonography, of whom 293 (6.9%) were diagnosed with Cesarean scar defects. Eighty-six patients were excluded due to other uterine pathologies. Altogether, 207 patients with Cesarean scar defects were included in this study. Women who had undergone multiple Cesarean sections tended to have larger scar defects (in width and depth) than did those who had undergone a single Cesarean section. Women with retroflexed uteri also tended to have wider defects than those with anteflexed uteri. Defect width was significantly greater in women with postmenstrual spotting, dysmenorrhea and chronic pelvic pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Multiple Cesarean sections and retroflexed uteri are risk factors for larger Cesarean scar defects. The size of the Cesarean scar defect is associated with clinical symptoms such as postmenstrual spotting, dysmenorrhea and chronic pelvic pain.

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PMID:
19565535
DOI:
10.1002/uog.6405
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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