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Pediatr Radiol. 2009 Sep;39(9):962-8. doi: 10.1007/s00247-009-1313-7. Epub 2009 Jun 30.

Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey.

RESULTS:

In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey.

CONCLUSION:

Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children.

PMID:
19565233
DOI:
10.1007/s00247-009-1313-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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