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J Rehabil Med. 2009 Jul;41(8):604-12. doi: 10.2340/16501977-0372.

Predictors of pain and function outcome after rehabilitation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. spiva@pitt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify changes in impairments associated with functional and pain outcome in patients with patello-femoral pain syndrome following a standardized physiotherapy treatment.

DESIGN:

One group pre-post design.

SUBJECTS:

Seventy-four patients (median age 27 years, 52% female) diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome and referred to physiotherapy treatment.

METHODS:

Baseline measures included self-reported function and pain, which were the dependent variables, and measures of independent variables: strength of quadriceps, hip abduction and hip external rotation; length of hamstrings, quadriceps, plantar flexors, iliotibial band/tensor fascia lata complex, and lateral retinaculum; quality of movement, and fear-avoidance beliefs. Following the baseline measurements, subjects participated in a standardized physiotherapy program. Measurements were repeated at 2-month follow-up. Data were analyzed using 2 forward regression models, the first using function outcome, and the second using pain outcome as the criterion. Age, gender, height and weight were controlled in the regression models.

RESULTS:

Change in fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity and change in gastrocnemius length predicted function outcome. Change in fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity and about work predicted outcome of pain.

CONCLUSION:

Change in fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity was the strongest predictor of function and pain outcome. The fact that patients who decreased their fear-avoidance beliefs improved function and decreased pain indicates that perhaps fear-avoidance beliefs should be targeted during the treatment of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

PMID:
19565153
DOI:
10.2340/16501977-0372
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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