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Evid Based Dent. 2009;10(2):40-1. doi: 10.1038/sj.ebd.6400644.

Is oral irrigation beneficial to gingival health as an adjunct to toothbrushing?

Author information

1
Faculty of Dentistry, Periodontology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Erratum in

  • Evid Based Dent. 2009;10(3):66.

Abstract

DATA SOURCES:

Relevant papers were identified by using Medline-PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials.

STUDY SELECTION:

Papers were assessed for inclusion independently by two reviewers and only those published in the English language were chosen. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCT) or controlled clinical trials (CCT) conducted in adults with good general health were selected.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Evaluation parameters included changes in dental plaque, gingival bleeding/ inflammation and probing pocket depth. Study quality was assessed based upon study design, evaluation period, profiles of subjects, method of randomisation, blindness of examiners and completeness of followup assessment.

DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS:

Data were extracted by three reviewers. As the selected studies showed considerable heterogeneity in the study designs, characteristics, outcome variables and results, a descriptive review of the data was presented instead of performing a meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

Seven papers (four RCT and three CCT) were included. Mean values and standard deviations were collected from the data. Data showed that oral irrigation does not reduce plaque scores more than toothbrushing or regular oral hygiene measures.

CONCLUSIONS:

This systematic review suggests that oral irrigation as an adjunct to toothbrushing does not have a beneficial effect in reducing dental plaque, but it may improve gingival health.

PMID:
19561573
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ebd.6400644

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