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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Oct;64(10):1071-81. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glp082. Epub 2009 Jun 26.

Hormone therapy and skeletal muscle strength: a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55455, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Our objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the research literature that compared muscle strength in postmenopausal women who were and were not on estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT).

METHODS:

Twenty-three relevant studies were found. Effect sizes (ESs) were calculated as the standardized mean difference, and meta-analyses were completed using a random effects model.

RESULTS:

HT was found to result in a small beneficial effect on muscle strength in postmenopausal women (overall ES = 0.23; p = .003) that equated to an approximately 5% greater strength for women on HT. Among the 23 studies, various muscle groups were assessed for strength, and those that benefitted the most were the thumb adductors (ES = 1.14; p < .001). Ten studies that compared muscle strength in rodents that were and were not estradiol deficient were also analyzed. The ES for absolute strength was moderate but not statistically significant (ES = 0.44; p = .12), whereas estradiol had a large effect on strength normalized to muscle size (ES = 0.66; p = .03).

CONCLUSION:

Overall, estrogen-based treatments were found to beneficially affect strength.

PMID:
19561145
PMCID:
PMC2737591
DOI:
10.1093/gerona/glp082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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