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J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2009 Aug;20(8):1031-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jvir.2009.05.003. Epub 2009 Jun 28.

Importance of angiographic visualization of round ligament arteries in women evaluated for intractable vaginal bleeding after uterine artery embolization.

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1
Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the incidence of angiographic visualization and the clinical significance of round ligament arteries in patients who present with intractable vaginal bleeding.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A review of 113 patients (age range, 20-67 years) who underwent pelvic angiography for intractable vaginal bleeding between June 1992 and May 2008 was retrospectively performed. It was recorded whether round ligament artery was visualized on pelvic aortography after uterine artery embolization (UAE). The medical records of the patients were reviewed to analyze the final clinical outcome. The Fisher exact test was used to correlate persistent vaginal bleeding after UAE with visualization of round ligament arteries.

RESULTS:

Of 111 patients who underwent UAE, 42 patients (postpartum bleeding, n = 40; postabortion bleeding, n = 2) had at least one visible round ligament artery on postembolization pelvic aortography. Ten patients received round ligament artery embolization. Persistent vaginal bleeding after adequate UAE was observed more commonly in patients whose round ligament artery was seen on postembolization pelvic aortography (P = .007).

CONCLUSIONS:

Round ligament arteries are commonly visualized in patients who present with postpartum bleeding and should be investigated when there is persistent bleeding, even after adequate UAE.

PMID:
19560937
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvir.2009.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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