Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Stroke. 2009 Sep;40(9):3022-7. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.554378. Epub 2009 Jun 25.

Descriptive analysis of the Boston criteria applied to a Dutch-type cerebral amyloid angiopathy population.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. S.van_Rooden@lumc.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Validation of the Boston criteria for the in vivo diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is challenging, because noninvasive diagnostic tests do not exist. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type is an accepted monogenetic model of CAA and diagnosis can be made with certainty based on DNA analysis. The aim of this study was to analyze and refine the existing Boston criteria in patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type.

METHODS:

We performed T2*-weighted MRI in 27 patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type to assess the presence and location of microbleeds, intracranial hemorrhages, and superficial siderosis. Using the Boston criteria, subjects were categorized as having: no hemorrhages, possible CAA, probable CAA, and hemorrhagic lesions not qualifying for CAA. The sensitivity of the Boston criteria was calculated separately using intracranial hemorrhages only and using intracranial hemorrhages and microbleeds.

RESULTS:

The sensitivity of the Boston criteria for probable CAA increased from 48% to 63% when microbleeds were included. For symptomatic subjects only, the sensitivity was 100%. No hemorrhages were identified in the deep white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus, or brainstem. Superficial siderosis, observed in 6 patients, did not increase the sensitivity of the Boston criteria in our study group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data show that using T2*-weighted MRI and including microbleeds increase the sensitivity of the Boston criteria. The exclusion of hemorrhages in the deep white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem does not lower the sensitivity of the Boston criteria.

PMID:
19556530
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.554378
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center