Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Pathol. 2009 Jul;175(1):365-75. doi: 10.2353/ajpath.2009.081165.

Gastrin is an essential cofactor for helicobacter-associated gastric corpus carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice.

Author information

1
Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

We have previously described a synergistic interaction between hypergastrinemia and Helicobacter felis infection on gastric corpus carcinogenesis in FVB/N mice housed under specific-pathogen-free conditions. However, gastrin-deficient (GAS-KO) mice on a mixed C57BL/6/129Sv genetic background maintained in conventional housing were reported to develop spontaneous gastric antral tumors. Therefore, we investigated the role of gastrin in Helicobacter-associated gastric carcinogenesis in H. felis-infected mice on a uniform C57BL/6 background housed in specific-pathogen-free conditions. Hypergastrinemic transgenic (INS-GAS) mice, GAS-KO mice, and C57BL/6 wild-type mice were infected with H. felis for either 12 or 18 months. At 12 months postinfection, INS-GAS mice had mild corpus dysplasia, while B6 wild-type mice had either severe gastritis or metaplasia, and GAS-KO mice had only mild to moderate gastritis. At 18 months postinfection, both INS-GAS and B6 wild-type mice had both severe atrophic gastritis and corpus dysplasia, while GAS-KO mice had severe gastritis with mild gastric atrophy, but no corpus dysplasia. In contrast, both GAS-KO and B6 wild-type mice had mild to moderate antral dysplasia, while INS-GAS mice did not. H. felis antral colonization remained stable over time among the three groups of mice. These results point to a distinct effect of gastrin on carcinogenesis of both the gastric corpus and antrum, suggesting that gastrin is an essential cofactor for gastric corpus carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice.

PMID:
19556515
PMCID:
PMC2708822
DOI:
10.2353/ajpath.2009.081165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center