Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Kidney Int. 2009 Sep;76(5):521-7. doi: 10.1038/ki.2009.234. Epub 2009 Jun 24.

Deletion of LOX-1 attenuates renal injury following angiotensin II infusion.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.

Abstract

Angiotensin II upregulates the expression of LOX-1, a recently identified oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor controlled by redox state which in turn upregulates angiotensin II activity on its activation. To test whether interruption of this positive feedback loop might reduce angiotensin II-induced hypertension and subsequent renal injury, we studied LOX-1 knockout mice. After infusion with angiotensin II for 4 weeks systolic blood pressure gradually increased in the wild-type mice; this rise was significantly attenuated in the LOX-1 knockout mice. Along with the rise in systolic blood pressure, renal function (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) decreased in the wild-type mice, but the deterioration of function was significantly less in the LOX-1 knockout mice. Glomerulosclerosis, arteriolar sclerosis, tubulointerstitial damage, and renal collagen accumulation were all significantly less in the LOX-1 knockout mice. The reduction in collagen formation was accompanied by a decrease in connective tissue growth factor mRNA, angiotensin type 1 receptor expression, and phosphorylation of p38 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was increased in the kidneys of the LOX-1 knockout mice compared to the wild-type mice. Overall, our study suggests that LOX-1 is a key modulator in the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and subsequent renal damage.

PMID:
19553911
DOI:
10.1038/ki.2009.234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center