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PLoS One. 2009 Jun 9;4(6):e5611. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005611.

Recurrent genomic gains in preinvasive lesions as a biomarker of risk for lung cancer.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. pierre.massion@vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

Lung carcinoma development is accompanied by field changes that may have diagnostic significance. We have previously shown the importance of chromosomal aneusomy in lung cancer progression. Here, we tested whether genomic gains in six specific loci, TP63 on 3q28, EGFR on 7p12, MYC on 8q24, 5p15.2, and centromeric regions for chromosomes 3 (CEP3) and 6 (CEP6), may provide further value in the prediction of lung cancer. Bronchial biopsy specimens were obtained by LIFE bronchoscopy from 70 subjects (27 with prevalent lung cancers and 43 individuals without lung cancer). Twenty six biopsies were read as moderate dysplasia, 21 as severe dysplasia and 23 as carcinoma in situ (CIS). Four-micron paraffin sections were submitted to a 4-target FISH assay (LAVysion, Abbott Molecular) and reprobed for TP63 and CEP 3 sequences. Spot counts were obtained in 30-50 nuclei per specimen for each probe. Increased gene copy number in 4 of the 6 probes was associated with increased risk of being diagnosed with lung cancer both in unadjusted analyses (odds ratio = 11, p<0.05) and adjusted for histology grade (odds ratio = 17, p<0.05). The most informative 4 probes were TP63, MYC, CEP3 and CEP6. The combination of these 4 probes offered a sensitivity of 82% for lung cancer and a specificity of 58%. These results indicate that specific cytogenetic alterations present in preinvasive lung lesions are closely associated with the diagnosis of lung cancer and may therefore have value in assessing lung cancer risk.

PMID:
19547694
PMCID:
PMC2699220
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0005611
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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