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Circ Res. 1991 Dec;69(6):1632-9.

Inositol trisphosphate promotes Na-Ca exchange current by releasing calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac myocytes.

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1
Department of Pharmacology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington 06030.

Abstract

An early inward tail current evoked by membrane depolarization (from -80 to -40 mV) sufficient to activate sodium but not calcium current was studied in single voltage-clamped ventricular myocytes isolated from guinea pig hearts. Like forward-mode Na-Ca exchange, this early inward tail current required [Na+]o and [Ca2+]i and is thought to follow earlier reverse-mode Na-Ca exchange that triggers Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum. The dependence of the early inward tail current on [Ca2+]i was supported by the ability of small (+10 mV) and large (+80 mV) voltage jumps from -40 mV to decrease and increase, respectively, the size of early inward tail currents evoked by subsequent voltage steps from -80 to -40 mV. As expected, tetrodotoxin selectively inhibited the early inward tail current but not the late inward tail current that followed voltage jumps to +40 mV test potentials. Although tetrodotoxin also blocked the fast Na+ current, replacement of extracellular Na+ by Li+ sustained the fast Na+ current. However, Li+, which does not support Na-Ca exchange, reversibly suppressed both the early and late inward tail currents. Inhibitors (ryanodine and caffeine) and promoters (intracellularly dialyzed inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release decreased and increased, respectively, the magnitude of the early inward tail current. The results substantiate the hypothesis that Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum participates in early Na-Ca exchange current and demonstrate that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, by releasing Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, can promote Na-Ca exchange across the plasma membrane.

PMID:
1954683
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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