Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biotechnol Adv. 2009 Nov-Dec;27(6):764-781. doi: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2009.06.002. Epub 2009 Jun 17.

Metabolic pathways of clostridia for producing butanol.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1; Department of Chemical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Azadi Square, Pardis Campus, Mashhad, Postal Code 9177948944, Khorasan, Iran. Electronic address: rgheshla@engmail.uwaterloo.ca.
2
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. Electronic address: jscharer@uwaterloo.ca.
3
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. Electronic address: mooyoung@uwaterloo.ca.
4
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. Electronic address: cpchou@uwaterloo.ca.

Abstract

Worldwide demand for energy has been the impetus for research to produce alcohol biofuels from renewable resources. This review focuses on the biosynthesis of butanol, which is regarded to be superior to ethanol as a fuel. Although acetone/butanol fermentation is one of the oldest large-scale fermentation processes, butanol yield by anaerobic fermentation remains sub-optimal. Metabolic engineering provides a means for fermentation improvements. Consequently, a comprehensive assessment of the intermediary enzymes involved in butanol formation from carbohydrates by the saccharolytic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum and other closely allied clostridia was performed to provide guidelines for potentially enhancing butanol productivity. The activity of the enzymes, their regulation and contribution to the metabolic pathways was reviewed. Published kinetic data for each important enzymatic reaction were assessed. For most enzymatic reactions, the systematic investigation of the kinetic data and the properties of the enzymes led to the development of rate equations that were able to describe activity as the function of the substrates, products, and allosteric effectors.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center