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J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2009 May-Jun;38(3):290-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1552-6909.2009.01022.x.

Interactions between adolescent fathers and health care professionals during pregnancy, labor, and early postpartum.

Author information

1
Department of Health Systems Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Room 952 (m/c 802), Chicago, IL 60612-7350, USA. dallascm@uic.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine interactions between adolescent fathers and health care professionals from the perspectives of the families of the adolescent fathers during pregnancy and early postpartum.

DESIGN:

Content analysis methods were used to analyze data from the prenatal and 1 month data points of a larger longitudinal qualitative case study design examining paternal involvement. A purposive sample of 25 sets of unmarried, low-income Black adolescent fathers, adolescent mothers, and at least one of each of their parents were individually interviewed at 1, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after birth using a semistructured interview guide.

SETTING:

Approximately 90% of participants were interviewed in their homes.

PARTICIPANTS:

Annual household incomes were between 0 dollars to 28K dollars (M=14,661 dollars). The 111 participants included 25 sets of adolescent parents, 50 grandmothers, and 11 grandfathers. Approximately 75% of the adolescent fathers were 17 to 19 years of age.

RESULTS:

Supportive (information, emotional, and material support), distancing, and neutralizing interactions between health care professionals and adolescent fathers were identified.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although most interactions were perceived as supportive, distancing, and neutralizing interactions could potentially have negative long-term effects for these vulnerable families and contribute to disparities in health care. Nurses may be important resources for these new fathers.

PMID:
19538617
PMCID:
PMC3837446
DOI:
10.1111/j.1552-6909.2009.01022.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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