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Clin Neurophysiol. 2009 Jul;120(7):1352-63. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2009.05.013. Epub 2009 Jun 16.

N100 cortical potentials accompanying disrupted auditory nerve activity in auditory neuropathy (AN): effects of signal intensity and continuous noise.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Med. Surge I, Room 150, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4290, USA. hjmichal@uci.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Auditory temporal processes in quiet are impaired in auditory neuropathy (AN) similar to normal hearing subjects tested in noise. N100 latencies were measured from AN subjects at several tone intensities in quiet and noise for comparison with a group of normal hearing individuals.

METHODS:

Subjects were tested with brief 100 ms tones (1.0 kHz, 100-40 dB SPL) in quiet and in continuous noise (90 dB SPL). N100 latency and amplitude were analyzed as a function of signal intensity and audibility.

RESULTS:

N100 latency in AN in quiet was delayed and amplitude was reduced compared to the normal group; the extent of latency delay was related to psychoacoustic measures of gap detection threshold and speech recognition scores, but not to audibility. Noise in normal hearing subjects was accompanied by N100 latency delays and amplitude reductions paralleling those found in AN tested in quiet. Additional N100 latency delays and amplitude reductions occurred in AN with noise.

CONCLUSIONS:

N100 latency to tones and performance on auditory temporal tasks were related in AN subjects. Noise masking in normal hearing subjects affected N100 latency to resemble AN in quiet.

SIGNIFICANCE:

N100 latency to tones may serve as an objective measure of the efficiency of auditory temporal processes.

PMID:
19535287
PMCID:
PMC2751735
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2009.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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