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Curr Med Res Opin. 2009 Aug;25(8):1869-78. doi: 10.1185/03007990903035745.

Treatment patterns and symptom control in patients with GERD: US community-based survey.

Author information

1
University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0362, USA. wchey@umich.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most commonly used pharmacological treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the utilization patterns of PPIs and other GERD-related medications, satisfaction with PPI treatment and presence of GERD symptoms.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

GERD patients using prescription PPIs were identified from a mixed-model HMO health plan. Utilization patterns of PPIs and other GERD medications, satisfaction with PPI treatment and presence of GERD symptoms were assessed using questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Among the 617 patients who completed the survey, 71.0% used PPIs once a day (QD), 22.2% used twice a day (BID) and 6.8% more than twice a day or on an as-needed basis. Approximately 42.1% of all patients supplemented their prescription PPIs with other GERD medications, including over-the-counter medications and H(2)-receptor antagonists. Over 85% of the patients still experienced GERD symptoms and 82.7% nighttime symptoms. Overall, 72.8% of all patients were satisfied or very satisfied with their PPI treatment.

LIMITATIONS:

The study used self-reported data which may have been subject to recall bias. As the study was conducted in a specific region of the US, the results may have limited generalizability to other US regions or countries.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients on PPI treatment often experience GERD symptoms and supplement their prescription PPIs with other GERD medications. A substantial proportion of GERD patients receiving PPI treatment are on a BID regimen. Furthermore, more than a quarter of the patients are not completely satisfied with their PPI treatment.

PMID:
19530980
DOI:
10.1185/03007990903035745
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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