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Int J Cancer. 2009 Dec 15;125(12):2945-52. doi: 10.1002/ijc.24645.

Dietary flavonol, flavone and catechin intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

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1
Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. colinda.simons@epid.unimaas.nl

Abstract

Dietary flavonoids are hypothesized to be protective against colorectal cancer, yet findings have been inconsistent. We examined the association of dietary flavonol, flavone and catechin intake with colorectal cancer endpoints within the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS). In addition, we explored whether body mass index (BMI) may be an effect modifier of this association. The NLCS includes 120,852 men and women who were 55-69 years and completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline in 1986. A case-cohort approach was used for data processing and analysis. After 13.3 years, 1,444 male and 1,041 female colorectal cancer cases were available for estimation of hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for quintiles of flavonoid intake. After adjustment for potential confounders, no association of total flavonol and flavone intake and total catechin intake with colorectal cancer endpoints was observed. Analyses stratified for BMI showed significant inverse trends in the association of total catechin intake, (+)-catechin intake and (-)-epicatechin intake with rectal cancer in men with a BMI>or=25 kg/m2 and in the association of total catechin intake and intake of kaempferol, myricetin and all individual catechins with colorectal cancer, in particular colon cancer, in women with a BMI<25 kg/m2. In conclusion, our findings generally do not support an association of dietary flavonol, flavone and catechin intake with colorectal cancer endpoints. Dietary catechin intake may be associated with a decreased rectal cancer risk in overweight men. Dietary flavonol and catechin intake may be associated with a decreased colorectal cancer risk in normal weight women.

PMID:
19530252
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.24645
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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