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J Gen Intern Med. 2009 Aug;24(8):929-33. doi: 10.1007/s11606-009-1032-7. Epub 2009 Jun 12.

Impact of a pre-clinical clinical skills curriculum on student performance in third-year clerkships.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 N.E. Pacific St., Campus Box 356429, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. blackley@u.washington.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research on the outcomes of pre-clinical curricula for clinical skills development is needed to assess their influence on medical student performance in clerkships.

OBJECTIVE:

To better understand the impact of a clinical-skills curriculum in the pre-clinical setting on student performance.

DESIGN:

We conducted a non-randomized, retrospective, pre-post review of student performance evaluations from 3rd-year clerkships, before and after implementation of a clinical-skills curriculum, the Colleges (2001-2007).

MAIN RESULTS:

Comparisons of clerkship performance data revealed statistically significant differences favoring the post-Colleges group in the Internal Medicine clerkship for 9 of 12 clinical-skills domains, including Technical Communication Skills (p < 0.023, effect size 0.16), Procedural Skills (p < 0.031, effect size 0.17), Communication Skills (p < 0.003, effect size 0.21), Patient Relationships (p < 0.003, effect size 0.21), Professional Relationships (p < 0.021, effect size 0.17), Educational Attitudes (p < 0.001, effect size 0.24), Initiative and Interest (p < 0.032, effect size 0.15), Attendance and Participation (p < 0.007, effect size 0.19), and Dependability (p < 0.008, effect size 0.19). Statistically significant differences were identified favoring the post-Colleges group in technical communication skills for three of six basic clerkships (Internal Medicine, Surgery, and Pediatrics).

CONCLUSIONS:

Implementation of a pre-clinical fundamental skills curriculum appears to be associated with improved clerkship performance in the 3rd year of medical school, particularly in the Internal Medicine clerkship. Similar curricula, focused on teaching clinical skills in small groups at the bedside with personalized mentoring from faculty members, may improve student performance. Continued efforts are needed to understand how to best prepare students for clinical clerkships and how to evaluate outcomes of similar pre-clinical skills programs.

PMID:
19521738
PMCID:
PMC2710476
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-009-1032-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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