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Am J Surg. 2010 Apr;199(4):453-8. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2009.02.004. Epub 2009 Jun 11.

Torsion of the primary epiploic appendagitis: a case series and review of the literature.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Ufuk University, Medical School, Mevlana Bulvari 86-88 Mevlana, 06520, Ankara, Turkey. drsozdemir@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Differential diagnosis and appropriate treatment of epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a dilemma for general surgeons because of nonspecific signs and symptoms.

METHODS:

Twelve patients (3 women and 9 men, average age 40 years, range 18-82 years) who were diagnosed as having EA upon presenting to the emergency department or at the time of discharge between April 2002 and September 2008 were included.

RESULTS:

The major presenting symptom was abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed well-localized tenderness in all cases (n = 12); in addition, rebound tenderness and distention were also observed. Laboratory blood tests were normal except for 4 patients who had leukocytosis. Seven cases were diagnosed by an abdominal computed tomography scan. Five patients required surgical intervention, whereas the remaining did not.

CONCLUSIONS:

Surgeons should be aware of this self-limiting disease that mimics many other intra-abdominal acute conditions. An abdominal computed tomography scan has a significant role in accurate diagnosis of EA before surgery to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions.

PMID:
19520357
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2009.02.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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