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Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(5):412-9. doi: 10.1080/08039480903009126.

Do gender and level of relational functioning influence the long-term treatment response in dynamic psychotherapy?

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1
Department of Psychiatry, PO Box 85, Vinderen Diakonhjemmet Hospital, N-0319 Oslo, Norway. Randi.Ulberg@medisin.uio.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gender as a moderator of long-term treatment effects has to a very little extent been explored in individual psychotherapy. We have previously reported a short-term difference in treatment-response to transference interpretations between women with poor relational functioning (low Quality of Object Relations Scale; low QOR) and men with good relational functioning (high QOR). The present study focuses on whether there also is a sustained difference in treatment-response between those two subgroups.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

In the First Experimental Study of Transference-interpretations (FEST), patients (n=100) were randomized to receive dynamic psychotherapy over 1 year with either a moderate level of transference interpretations or no transference interpretations. Assessments were made at pre-treatment, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and at 1- and 3-year follow-ups. The outcome measures used were the Psychodynamic Functioning Scales (PFS), Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-C), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and Symptom Checklist-90 (GSI). Change was assessed using linear-mixed models.

RESULTS:

In the moderator analyses, women with low QOR showed a significant positive long-term treatment effect of transference interpretation (P=0.005), while men with high QOR responded equally well to both therapies.

CONCLUSION:

Women with poor relational functioning and men with good relational functioning showed sustained different treatment-response to transference interpretations.

PMID:
19513933
DOI:
10.1080/08039480903009126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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