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Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Jul;37(4):413-30. doi: 10.1017/S135246580999004X. Epub 2009 Jun 10.

Participants' experiences of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: "It changed me in just about every way possible".

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1
University of Exeter, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is a promising approach to help people who suffer recurrent depression prevent depressive relapse. However, little is known about how MBCT works. Moreover, participants' subjective experiences of MBCT as a relapse prevention treatment remain largely unstudied.

AIM:

This study examines participants' representations of their experience of MBCT and its value as a relapse-prevention program for recurrent depression.

METHOD:

Twenty people who had participated in MBCT classes for recurrent depression within a primary care setting were interviewed 12 months after treatment. The focus of the interview was on participants' reflections on what they found helpful, meaningful and difficult about MBCT as a relapse prevention program. Thematic analysis was used to identify the key patterns and elements in participants' accounts.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Four overarching themes were extracted: control, acceptance, relationships and struggle. The theoretical, clinical and research implications are discussed.

PMID:
19508744
DOI:
10.1017/S135246580999004X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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