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Obes Surg. 2009 Aug;19(8):1084-8. doi: 10.1007/s11695-009-9879-6. Epub 2009 Jun 9.

Improvement of metabolic syndrome following intragastric balloon: 1 year follow-up analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, General Surgery, University of Brescia, Ple Spedali Civili 1, 25123, Brescia, Italy. cirioz@libero.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to assess the impact of intragastric balloon (IGB)-induced body weight loss on metabolic syndrome in obese patients and evaluate what happens during 1-year follow-up.

METHODS:

To this end, data were collected on 143 obese patients (body mass index (BMI) 36.2+/-5.7 kg/m2) who underwent IGB insertion between January 2000 and December 2005. Outcomes were recorded at BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon removal time (t0) and at 6-month (t6) and 12-month (t12) follow-up.

RESULTS:

Significant BMI, excess body weight loss percentage, and body weight loss percentage (BWL%) were observed at t0 (29.6+/-4.6 kg/m2; 29.3+/-4.8%; 14.1+/-5.7%), followed by partial weight regain at t12 (32.4+/-4.3 kg/m2; 26.1+/-4.9%; 11.2+/-4.6%). Incidence of metabolic syndrome dropped from 34.8% (pre-IGB value) to 14.5% (t0) and 11.6% (t12). Likewise, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and blood hypertension (BH) incidence decreased from 32.6%, 37.7%, 33.4%, and 44.9% (pre-IGB values) to 20.9%, 14.5%, 16.7%, and 30.4% at t0 and 21.3%, 17.4%, 18.9%, and 34.8% at t12. HbA1c blood concentration shifted from an initial value of 7.5+/-2.1% to 5.7+/-1.9% (t0), 5.6+/-0.7% (t6), and 5.5+/-0.9% (t12). Patients suffering from DM or BH stopped or diminished relative drug consumption at t12. Negligible modifications were reported as regards HDL cholesterol and hyperuricemia.

CONCLUSION:

Weight regain is commonly observed during long-term follow-up after IGB removal. Nevertheless, the maintenance of at least 10% of the BWL%, as reported at 1-year follow-up, is associated with an improvement in metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
19506981
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-009-9879-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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