Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Neurol. 2009 Jun;66(6):723-8. doi: 10.1001/archneurol.2009.100.

How seizure detection by continuous electroencephalographic monitoring affects the prescribing of antiepileptic medications.

Author information

1
Epilepsy Service, Department of Neurology, ACC 7, Massachusetts General Hospital, 15 Parkman St, Boston, MA 02114, USA. rkilbride@partners.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the effect of continuous electroencephalographic monitoring on the decision to treat seizures in the inpatient setting, particularly in the intensive care unit.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Medical and neuroscience intensive care units and neurological wards.

PATIENTS:

Three hundred consecutive nonelective continuous electroencephalographic monitoring studies, performed on 287 individual inpatients over a 27-month period.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Epileptiform electroencephalographic abnormalities and changes in antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy based on the electroencephalographic findings.

RESULTS:

The findings from the continuous electroencephalographic monitoring led to a change in AED prescribing in 52% of all studies with initiation of an AED therapy in 14%, modification of AED therapy in 33%, and discontinuation of AED therapy in 5% of all studies. Specifically, the detection of electrographic seizures led to a change in AED therapy in 28% of all studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings of continuous electroencephalographic monitoring resulted in a change in AED prescribing during or after half of the studies performed. Most AED changes were made as a result of the detection of electrographic seizures.

PMID:
19506131
DOI:
10.1001/archneurol.2009.100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center