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Br J Radiol. 2010 Jan;83(985):67-70. doi: 10.1259/bjr/96908158. Epub 2009 Jun 8.

Comparison between conventional interrupted high-resolution CT and volume multidetector CT acquisition in the assessment of bronchiectasis.

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1
Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SA UK. ucyhill@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether there is superior diagnostic accuracy for the detection and exclusion of bronchiectasis using 16-slice CT of the chest (1 mm) compared with conventional high-resolution CT (HRCT) of the chest (10 mm). A prospective study was carried out in patients who were referred for chest CT by a chest physician for the investigation of bronchiectasis over a 1-year period. All scans were performed using a 16-slice CT scanner. In addition to contiguous 1 mm slices, conventional HRCT images (1 mm slice every 10 mm) were prepared. Both datasets were dual read. There were 53 patients with a median age of 62 years (range, 51.5-71.5 years), comprising 14 males and 39 females. 10 of 53 scans had no bronchiectasis in either dataset. 36 patients had bronchiectasis diagnosed on both HRCT and 1 mm scans. Two patients had tubular bronchiectasis on the HRCT scans, which was not confirmed on the 1 mm scans. Five patients had confirmed tubular bronchiectasis on the 1 mm scans, which was not identified on HRCT scans. 40 extra lobes demonstrated bronchiectasis on the 1 mm vs the HRCT scans; of these, half were labelled as definite bronchiectasis on the 1 mm scan. There was a 32% increased confidence with the 1 mm scans compared with conventional HRCT of the chest in the diagnosis of bronchiectasis (p < 0.001). In conclusion, there is improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence for diagnosis and exclusion of bronchiectasis using 16-slice chest CT (1 mm cuts) compared with conventional HRCT of the chest.

PMID:
19505963
PMCID:
PMC3486721
DOI:
10.1259/bjr/96908158
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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