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Br J Nutr. 2009 Nov;102(9):1355-61. doi: 10.1017/S0007114509990298. Epub 2009 Jun 9.

Erythrocyte fatty acid profiles can predict acute non-fatal myocardial infarction.

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1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea. yongsoon@hanyang.ac.kr

Abstract

The risk of CHD has been linked to n-3 and trans-fatty acids. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the hypothesis that lower n-3 fatty acids and higher trans-fatty acids in erythrocytes are associated with an increased risk of acute non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), and that fatty acid profiles can discriminate MI cases from controls. Fifty cases with acute non-fatal MI and fifty age- and sex-matched controls without MI were recruited. The Omega-3 Index (the sum of EPA and DHA in erythrocytes) was significantly lower in cases than controls (9.57 (SEM 0.28) v. 11.81 (SEM 0.35) %; P < 0.001), while total trans-fatty acids were significantly higher (1.01 (SEM 0.04) v. 0.56 (SEM 0.03) %; P < 0.001). The Omega-3 Index was associated with decreased risk of MI (OR 0.08 (95 % CI 0.02, 0.38); P = 0.001), while total trans-fatty acids were associated with an increased risk of MI (OR 72.67 (95 % CI 6.68, 790.74); P < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of fatty acid profiles was larger than that for traditional risk factors, suggesting that fatty acid profiles make a higher contribution to the discrimination of MI cases from controls compared with modified Framingham risk factors. In conclusion, a higher Omega-3 Index and lower trans-fatty acids in erythrocytes are associated with a decreased risk of MI. Furthermore, fatty acid profiles improve discrimination of acute non-fatal MI compared with established risk factors.

PMID:
19505347
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114509990298
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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