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J Clin Anesth. 2009 Jun;21(4):253-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinane.2008.08.019. Epub 2009 Jun 6.

Anesthesia-controlled time and turnover time for ambulatory upper extremity surgery performed with regional versus general anesthesia.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesia, University of California, San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA 92103-8770, USA. ermariano@ucsd.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To test the hypothesis that regional anesthesia (RA) employing a block room reduces anesthesia-controlled time for ambulatory upper extremity surgery compared with general anesthesia (GA).

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Outpatient surgery center of a university hospital.

PATIENTS:

229 adult patients who underwent ambulatory upper extremity surgery over one year.

INTERVENTIONS:

Upper extremity surgery was performed with three different anesthetic techniques: 1) GA, 2) nerve block (NB) performed preoperatively, or 3) local anesthetic (LA), either Bier block or local anesthetic, administered in the operating room (OR).

MEASUREMENTS:

Demographic data, anesthesia-controlled time, and turnover time were recorded. Since the data were not normally distributed, differences in anesthesia-controlled time and turnover time were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and post-hoc testing using one-way analysis of variance on the ranks of the observations, with Tukey-Kramer correction for multiple comparisons.

RESULTS:

Anesthesia-controlled time for NB (median 28 min) was significantly shorter than for GA (median 32 min, P = 0.0392). Anesthesia-controlled time for patients who received LA (median 25 min) was also significantly shorter than GA (P < 0.0001). However, turnover time did not differ significantly among the three groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Peripheral nerve block performed preoperatively in an induction area or LA injected in the OR significantly reduces anesthesia-controlled time for ambulatory upper extremity surgery compared with GA. Turnover time is unaffected by anesthetic technique. These results may increase acceptance of RA in the ambulatory surgery setting.

PMID:
19502033
PMCID:
PMC2745934
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinane.2008.08.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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