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Appetite. 2009 Jun;52(3):776-779. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2009.02.010. Epub 2009 Mar 5.

Should children drink more water?: the effects of drinking water on cognition in children.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of East London, Stratford Campus, University House, Romford Road, London, E15 4LZ, UK. Electronic address: c.edmonds@uel.ac.uk.
2
School of Psychology, University of East London, Stratford Campus, University House, Romford Road, London, E15 4LZ, UK. Electronic address: denise.burford@tiscali.co.uk.

Abstract

While dehydration has well-documented negative effects on adult cognition, there is little research on hydration and cognitive performance in children. We investigated whether having a drink of water improved children's performance on cognitive tasks. Fifty-eight children aged 7-9 years old were randomly allocated to a group that received additional water or a group that did not. Results showed that children who drank additional water rated themselves as significantly less thirsty than the comparison group (p=0.002), and they performed better on visual attention tasks (letter cancellation, p=0.02; spot the difference memory tasks, ps=0.019 and 0.014).

PMID:
19501780
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2009.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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