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Gynecol Oncol. 2009 Sep;114(3):390-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2009.05.013. Epub 2009 Jun 5.

Comprehensive analysis of Human Papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis in in-situ and invasive cervical adenocarcinoma.

Author information

1
DDL Diagnostic Laboratory, Voorburg, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has been implicated as a co-factor in cervical carcinogenesis. The goal of the current study was to investigate if Ct may play a role in pathogenesis of cervical adenocarcinoma and, specifically, if there is a co-infection between Ct and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical adenocarcinomas. The second goal of the study was to determine the distribution of HPV genotypes in most recent cases of in-situ and invasive cervical adenocarcinomas.

METHODS:

Biopsies of 71 cervical adenocarcinomas (31 in-situ and 40 invasive) were tested for the presence of Ct using two novel PCR assays. In addition, all cases were tested for HPV using SPF10-PCR assay and genotyped using LIPA(25) test.

RESULTS:

None of the cases was found to be positive for Ct using two independent PCR assays. All lesions, however, were positive for HPV with the exception of a case of minimal deviation adenocarcinoma. Overall, 94.2% of cases were positive for either HPV16 (n=44, 62.8%) or HPV18 (n=20, 28.5%), or both (n=2, 2.8%). Other single HPV types included HPV45 (n=3, 4.2%) and HPV35 (n=1, 1.4%).

CONCLUSION:

The study demonstrated lack of co-infection between Human Papillomavirus and C. trachomatis in in-situ and invasive adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. The role of Ct as a carcinogenetic co-factor may be restricted to cervical squamous cell carcinomas. Accounting for type cross-protection, currently available HPV vaccines are likely to prevent close to 100% of HPV-positive cervical adenocarcinomas.

PMID:
19500822
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2009.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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