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Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug 1;74(2):313-20. doi: 10.1002/ccd.22023.

Very long-term results comparing a simple versus a complex stenting strategy in the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions.

Author information

1
Interventional Cardiology, Division of Cardiology, University of Turin, S. Giovanni Battista Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The optimal stenting strategy for coronary bifurcation lesions has not yet been defined, especially given the lack of very long-term data (>24 months). We compared our long-term results of a simple vs complex stenting strategy in patients with bifurcation lesions.

METHODS:

We retrospectively selected subjects undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting in a bifurcation lesion between June 2002 and December 2005, comparing those treated with a simple technique vs those treated with a complex one. The primary end-point was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at >24 months of follow-up.

RESULTS:

A total of 326 patients were included, 64.7% treated with a simple technique (Group A) and 35.3% with a complex strategy (Group B). Drug-eluting stents were used in 82.0% and 73.0%, respectively (P = 0.059), final kissing balloon in 47.9% and 53.0% (P = 0.37), and procedural success obtained in 99.5% and 99.1% (P = 0.66). After a median of 34 months, MACE occurred in 52 (26.5%) in Group A and in 32 (31.4%) in Group B (P = 0.37), cardiac death in six (3.1%) vs four (3.9%, P = 0.70), myocardial infarction in 13 (6.6%) vs 6 (5.9%, P = 0.80), target vessel revascularization in 36 (18.4%) vs 29 (28.4%, P = 0.04), and bypass in five (2.6%) vs two (2%, P = 0.74). Definite stent thrombosis was adjudicated in two (1%) vs one (0.9%, P = 0.98).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study, comparing simple and complex stenting strategies for the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions, shows that both techniques are associated with favorable clinical results and low adverse events rates at long-term follow-up.

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PMID:
19496110
DOI:
10.1002/ccd.22023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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