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Eur J Pharm Sci. 2009 Jun 28;37(3-4):231-40. doi: 10.1016/j.ejps.2009.02.010. Epub 2009 Feb 28.

Bioadhesive properties and biodistribution of cyclodextrin-poly(anhydride) nanoparticles.

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1
Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Navarra, Apartado 177, 31008 Pamplona, Spain.

Abstract

This work describes the preparation, characterization and evaluation of the nanoparticles formed by the copolymer of methyl vinyl ether and maleic anhydride (Gantrez) AN) and cyclodextrins, including beta-cyclodextrin (CD) hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and 6-monodeoxy-6-monoamino-beta-cyclodextrin (NHCD). The cyclodextrin-poly(anhydride) nanoparticles were prepared by a solvent displacement method and characterized by measuring the size, zeta potential, morphology and composition. For bioadhesion studies, nanoparticles were fluorescently labelled with rhodamine B isothiocianate (RBITC). For in vivo imaging biodistribution studies, (99m)Tc-labelled nanoparticles were used. Nanoparticles displayed a size of about 150nm and a cyclodextrin content which was found optimal under the following experimental conditions: cyclodextrin/poly(anhydride) ratio of 0.25 by weight, 30min of incubation time between the cyclodextrin and the polymer. Moreover, the oligosaccharide content was higher with CD than with NHCD and HPCD. Overall, cyclodextrin-poly(anhydride) nanoparticles displayed homogeneous bioadhesive interactions within the gut. The intensity of these interactions was higher than for control nanoparticles. The high bioadhesive capacity was observed for HPCD-NP and NHCD-NP which can be related with their rough morphology and, thus, a higher specific surface than for smooth nanoparticles (CD-NP). Finally, from in vivo studies, no evidence of translocation of distribution to other organs was observed when these nanoparticles were orally administered.

PMID:
19491010
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejps.2009.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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