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Psychiatr Serv. 2009 Jun;60(6):838-41. doi: 10.1176/ps.2009.60.6.838.

Prevalence of and gender differences in psychiatric disorders among juvenile delinquents incarcerated for nine months.

Author information

1
Department of Anthropology, History, and Social Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 3333 California St., Suite 485, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. karnikn@dahsm.ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders among young offenders after they were incarcerated for nine months.

METHODS:

A total of 790 youths were surveyed, including a significant proportion of females (N=140, 18%), nine months after incarceration. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV with portions of the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents and the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality were used.

RESULTS:

Even when conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder were excluded, 88% of males and 92% of females had a psychiatric disorder (including substance use disorder); more than 80% of offenders met criteria for some type of substance use disorder. Gender differences were found for anxiety disorders (males 26%, females 55%, p<.01), marijuana dependence (males 32%, females 24%, p=.04), marijuana abuse (males 19%, females 11%, p=.04), and stimulant dependence (males 25%, females 44%, p<.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite nine months of incarceration, young offenders continued to show high levels of psychiatric and substance use disorders.

Comment in

PMID:
19487357
DOI:
10.1176/ps.2009.60.6.838
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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