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Psychol Aging. 2009 Jun;24(2):507-12. doi: 10.1037/a0016035.

The association of anxiety and depressive symptoms with cognitive performance in community-dwelling older adults.

Author information

1
Sierra Pacific Mental Illness, Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA. sherryb@stanford.edu

Abstract

The authors examined the association of anxiety, depressive symptoms, and their co-occurrence on cognitive processes in 102 community-dwelling older adults. Participants completed anxiety and depression questionnaires as well as measures of episodic and semantic memory, word fluency, processing speed/shifting attention, and inhibition. Participants with only increased anxiety had poorer processing speed/shifting attention and inhibition, but depressive symptoms alone were not associated with any cognitive deficits. Although coexisting anxiety and depressive symptoms were associated with deficits in 3 cognitive domains, reductions in inhibition were solely attributed to anxiety. Findings suggest an excess cognitive load on inhibitory ability in normal older adults reporting mild anxiety.

PMID:
19485667
PMCID:
PMC2725021
DOI:
10.1037/a0016035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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