Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Jun;90(6):1055-60. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2008.12.015.

Trunk muscle activation patterns and spine kinematics when using an oscillating blade: influence of different postures and blade orientations.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and Human Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare trunk muscle activation patterns and trunk kinematics when using an oscillating blade in standing and unsupported sitting postures, and with different orientations of the blade.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional survey of trunk muscle activities and lumbar motion.

SETTING:

Biomechanics research laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

Healthy men (N=13).

INTERVENTIONS:

An oscillating blade was held with 2 hands and oscillated with vertical and horizontal orientations of blade. These exercises were performed both in an erect standing position and in an erect sitting position.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Surface electromyography from 14 trunk and 2 shoulder muscles, together with lumbar angular displacement in the 3 planes of motion, were measured while subjects used an oscillating blade at different performance variations. Electromyographic signals were normalized to isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) amplitudes.

RESULTS:

With the exception of internal oblique and anterior deltoid for the horizontal condition, and erector spinae at L5 level for the vertical condition, the subject's posture had no effect on trunk muscular recruitment when using the oscillating blade. The vertical blade orientation resulted in higher amplitudes of spine rotation on the horizontal plane and produced the greatest activation levels of the internal oblique (47% MVC), pectoralis major (33% MVC), and external oblique (23% MVC). On the other hand, the horizontal orientation resulted in the greatest activation levels of erector spinae at T9 level (28% MVC), latissimus dorsi (26% MVC), and rectus abdominis (17% MVC).

CONCLUSIONS:

Muscle activation and spine motion from using an oscillating blade were not affected by the standing or sitting posture of the subject. The choice of blade orientation was more important, because it defined the main group of muscles recruited during the exercise.

PMID:
19480884
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2008.12.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center